Min menu

Pages

latest news

What was the Chinese laser attack's purpose, and why is it significant?

This did not happen on China Beach in the South China Sea, but rather off Australia's northern coast in the Arafura Sea, part of Australia's exclusive economic zone. According to what we can say, this is the earliest time that China has been subjected to military intimidation on our soil.

What was the Chinese laser attack's purpose, and why is it significant?

 
A Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA-N) passing ship launched a military - grade laser on an Australian Air Force aircraft that was conducting coastal naval surveillance shortly after midnight Thursday.


This did not happen on China Beach in the South China Sea, but rather off Australia's northern coast in the Arafura Sea, part of Australia's exclusive economic zone. According to what we can say, this is the earliest time that China has been subjected to military intimidation on our soil.




Since then, the Chinese vessel has rushed through the Torres Strait near the north end of Queensland, joined by another Chinese People's Liberation Army vessel, en route to the Coral Sea off the Great Barrier Reef.


They can observe the impending Australian military exercises off the coast of Queensland, which is legal as long as ships remain outside Australian territorial waters, extending 12 nautical miles from the coast.



  • On the other hand, laser shots were neither legal nor appropriate.


  • The Ministry of Defense has criticized the dangerous and unprofessional military behavior of the Chinese ship. Prime Minister Scott Morrison responded immediately, describing the event as an "act of intimidation" that endangered the lives of the military. Minister of Defence Peter Dutton described it as "aggressive and bullying behaviour."


  • To understand what laser attack is, why these lasers are used, and how dangerous they are, it is necessary first to understand what laser attack is. We must also explore why China is committing such an act.


The most important information of the Chinese laser weapon :-

  1- Lasers are installed on all modern warships. These are mostly used to determine the range of firing and to identify a target before firing a weapon. It's often done on fake targets.


  2- For at least two reasons, it's harmful. Before live munitions such as artillery shells, machine guns or rockets are fired, lasers are usually referred to as "target drawing." It is generally seen as a hostile act that does not amount to direct confrontation or war.


  3- ABC News reported seriously that it's really dangerous when we discover Chinese laser attacks shortly after they happen, given the loving anger of Scott Morrison.


  4- That's because a fraction of a second separates the laser from launching a rocket with hostile intent. For people exposed to such radiation, it can be a terrifying experience.


  5- Furthermore, lasers are considered dangerous because they can cause lifelong blindness if they are placed in a person's eyes, as well as damage to basic navigation and other related regulations that are essential for air safety.



For some time, laser indicators were common in the classroom until their risks were discovered. These lasers are much stronger and dangerous.


A Chinese laser was directed at an RAAF P- 8 A Poseidon, which can be compared to the Royal Australian P- 8 A Poseidon.


Chinese People's Liberation Army-N, Chinese Coast Guard and Chinese militia ships routinely encounter naval vessels operating in disputed waters in the South China Sea.



  • These Chinese ships have been involved in this type of behaviour against Australian, American and other aircraft for some time.




  • In undisputed waters near Australia - or within a nation's exclusive economic zone  

  •  this type of aggressive and powerful behaviour is unusual. This is also not a method that Australia is known to have used against the naval vessels of other States, particularly in or within China's exclusive economic zone. As a result, it appears that the situation is escalating.


  • China may be trying to convey a message to Canberra that naval patrols in the South China Sea are not welcome. In addition to other countries such as Japan, the United Kingdom and France, the U.S. Navy participates in these patrols, known as Freedom of Navigation Operations or FONOPS.




China views these FONOPS as aggressive, which in practice demands the entire South China Sea under the so-called "nine-point line." Chinese maritime claims were invalidated in 2016 by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, which supported the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), but China is still seeking to reformulate laws.

As a result, it appears that the situation is escalating.