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Vladimir Putin has opulent houses, massive boats, and Swiss bank accounts; how wealthy is he, and will US sanctions damage him?

Although Putin is widely regarded as one of the richest men in the world, he has only two old cars and a small apartment and whatever money the 69-year-old former KGB agent saved from a salary of about $140,000, according to an official. Documents.


 Ostensibly, the move by the United States to freeze Russian President Vladimir Putin's personal assets appears to be a meaningless gesture.


Although Putin is widely regarded as one of the richest men in the world, he has only two old cars and a small apartment and whatever money the 69-year-old former KGB agent saved from a salary of about $140,000, according to an official. Documents.


No one believed the official documents. Most experts believe that Putin's vast wealth is hidden in the hands of a small group of close relatives known as oligarchs and their families.




One modest task at a time is all it takes to change the world :-

Forbes magazine, which is known for rating billionaires in the world, claims to have spent 20 years trying to find an answer to this question. One of its editors was murdered in Moscow while investigating the first rulers of Russian oligarchs.


He thinks the Russian president's net fortune is billions :-


Putin's wealth is estimated at more than $200 billion by William Browder, a former Russian investor who was instrumental in the passage of the Magnetsky Act, which punishes foreign persons who commit human rights violations. This would put him on a level with Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla, as the richest person in the world.




  • His assessment was based on an oligarchic-Putin deal that Putin allegedly submitted in 2004. They couldn't say no to a mafia - style show: Putin will get half of everything they've won. Browder from London stated, "He has no money in his name."


  • Much of it is held in foreign accounts, investments and real estate. According to a 2017 report published by the National Bureau of Economic Research, wealthy Russians own an estimated $800 billion abroad.


  • This contains a great deal of real estate, primarily in Europe. Oliver Polov, a former Russian money - laundering eert, is set to relaunch "Thieves Rule Tours" across London, offering expensive homes owned by Russian oligarchs. According to Transparency International, Russians with links to the Kremlin or links to corruption bought $2 billion worth of British real estate, mostly in London, or Russian Londongrad - or Londongrad, as some refer to it.




He added: Russian businessmen and leaders transfer their hopes to the names of some of their acquaintances, relatives or friends in order to hide their money.

There's also palaces, luxury yachts and private jets to be taken into account. A few weeks before Putin invaded Ukraine, the 265-foot luxury yacht Graceful was seen unexpectedly leaving Germany for Russia, making Kremlin scientists laugh. Analysts believe that Putin's ship was moving it to a safer dock.


Near home, Alexei Navalny's team published a lengthy paper (in Russian) documenting a complex network of transports and people who went to the "Putin Palace," a vast property in southern Russia overlooking the Black Sea worth an estimated $1.3 billion. The property is owned by Russian billionaire Arkady Rotenberg, who has close ties to Putin.




The purpose of the sanctions is not to impoverished Putin. It is causing enough disruption in his inner circle to pressure him to change his behaviour.


  • Even if they were financially coerced, it's uncertain whether billionaires would dare urge Putin to leave Ukraine, let alone try to isolate him. According to Olga Khvostonova, president of the Institute of Modern Russia in New York, he developed many networks based on personal services and kompromat, or negative information, that give him control over others.


  • However, some argue that the billionaires who struck a Faustian deal with Putin are accustomed to a luxurious lifestyle and may not want to abandon it.


  • However, some argue that the billionaires who struck a Faustian deal with Putin are accustomed to a luxurious lifestyle and may not want to abandon it.


  • Putin gathered 37 businessmen at St. Catherine's Hall in the Kremlin on 24 February, the day he launched the invasion of Ukraine, according to Russian news agency Tass. It was true of the Russian businessmen, including some of the millions targeted by Western sanctions since then.