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Trump claimed to run the military independently - not the Secretary of Defense

In a comment contradicting former Defense Secretary Mark Esper, former President Donald Trump said he, not Esper, was in charge of the U.S. military.    The forthcoming book describes Esper's interactions with the former president about local and global security. Esper contends, among other things, that Trump planned to attack Mexico to fight drug cartels. In addition, he wanted to implement the Rebellion Act and deploy millions of troops on the streets to "Black Lives Matter" marches.    However, according to Trump, Esper was "very weak" and "because of that, I had to run the military."
 



In a comment contradicting former Defense Secretary Mark Esper, former President Donald Trump said he


not Esper, was in charge of the U.S. military.


The forthcoming book describes Esper's interactions with the former president about local and global security. 


Esper contends, among other things, that Trump planned to attack Mexico to fight drug cartels. In addition, he wanted to implement the Rebellion Act and deploy millions of troops on the streets to "Black Lives Matter" marches.


However, according to Trump, Esper was 


"very weak" and "because of that, I had to run the military."


In addition, the former President boasted that he had spent $2.5 trillion on the United States military and "created the Space Force." Trump continued by calling Esper "stiff" and "yes man."



Trump, known for generating titles such as "Lyin 'Ted" and "Little Marco", is trying to get his nickname "Yesper" stuck in everyone's mind.


Trump said when asked about Esper's phone call to Mark Meadows and claimed he was fired because he wasn't loyal enough to Trump.


Trump continues by saying he never considered passing the Insurrection Act in response to follow-up questioning. He didn't answer if he wanted to.


See Trump's full remarks below:


New facts about President Donald Trump's final days in office show that White House lawyer Pat Cipollone fought ferociously to prevent him from pursuing spurious allegations of rigged elections, including a procedure dubbed the "murder-suicide agreement."


"That message that this guy wants to send

 - that message is a murder-suicide pact," Cipollone told Trump.


  1. "It will hurt everyone who touches it.
  2. We should do nothing with this message.
  3. I do not want to see this message again at all ".


Former Justice Department employee Richard Donoghue testified before the committee that he had repeatedly tried to persuade Trump to abandon his plans to overturn the election
 but continued to push for increasingly rigorous methods.


"The President said something about the effect : 

'What should I lose? If I do this, what should I lose? 


"" I said : 'Mr. Mr. President, you have a lot to lose. Is this really how you want your administration to end? you will harm the country ".


  • From December 2020 until the end of Trump's term in January 2021
  • Donoghue served as interim deputy attorney general
  • and was in that position on the day of the January 6 rebellion.


During a call between then-President Donald Trump and then


Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen, he made handwritten remarks in which Trump pressed the two to take formal steps to reverse the results of the 2020 presidential election.


The deadline for four close Trump aides and allies called for private depositions and records in the committee's first round is fast approaching this week. 


By Thursday, all requests for documents must be submitted.


The Committee's interviews and subpoenas add to the hundreds of pages of documents the Committee has already requested from government agencies and the National Archives
 the Trump Administration's White House record-keeper on recruitment, planning and coordination of marches.


 In the weeks leading up to January 6 and his day.


Some people called us, who wanted to come and talk voluntarily, who worked in the administration. So, there's no reason to issue a subpoena.


 The Chairman of the Committee, Penny Thomas, stated, "We just have to get the information they included in our work package."