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NASA is broadcasting the first color images taken by the James Webb telescope. Photos

 

NASA revealed the first color images taken by the James Webb Space Telescope.   The footage was broadcast during a White House briefing in the presence of President Joe Biden and officials of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the first infrared images from the James Webb telescope.



NASA revealed the first color images taken by the James Webb Space Telescope.


The footage was broadcast during a White House briefing in the presence of President Joe Biden and officials of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the first infrared images from the James Webb telescope.


  • The James Webb JWST telescope reached its final orbit around the Sun about 930,000 miles from Earth's orbit in January 2022.
  • The technological improvements of the Earth's telescope vehicle and the distance with the Sun allow scientists to see much deeper into our universe and in greater detail.
  • NASA said the James Webb telescope, the most powerful observatory placed in orbit
  • reveals "the deepest and most accurate infrared image of the universe's genesis" ever, given more than 13 billion years.


The image is full of thousands of galaxies and shows the smallest objects ever observed.





Details of the mission "We overlooked" in the first image released to the James Webb telescope!


This week we witnessed the unveiling of the first full-color image of the James Webb telescope, followed shortly after by four brand new images showing our universe in unprecedented detail.


But there are very important details that we lost at first glance, surreptitiously located at the top left of the south ring nebula images in what looks like a line of light - but actually a side view of a galaxy.


Detecting the image, NASA astronomer Carl Gordon said: "I made a bet saying it was part of the nebula. I lost the bet, because then we looked more carefully at both the images of NIRcam [near infrared camera] and MIRI [medium infrared machine], and it is very clearly a galaxy heading to the edge. "


This perspective should allow astronomers to study how stars are distributed throughout the galaxy.


If you miss it, what you're looking at is amazing waves of death from the South Circular Nebula - a huge cloud of dust and gas located about 2,000 light years away.


  1. There are two stars in the middle.
  2. The faint dwarf is a white dwarf 
  3. the collapsed nucleus of a dead star - that, during his life
  4. was up to eight times the mass of the sun


He reached the end of his life, blew his outer layers, and the pulp collapsed into a super-dense object: up to 1.4 times the mass of the sun packed into an object the size of the Earth.


For the first time, JWST was able to reveal that this star was covered in dust. The brighter star is at an early stage of its development and will one day explode in its own nebula.


On the left, JWST's near-infrared camera reveals bubble orange hydrogen from newly formed expansions as well as a blue fog of hot ionized gas from the dead star's hot core.


On the right, in the photo taken by JWST's Infrared Intermediate, blue hydrocarbons form patterns similar to orange in the previous image, because they collect on the surface of hydrogen dust rings.