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A strange request from LGBTQ activists.

LGBTQ activists seek to prevent scientists from identifying human remains as "male" or "female", arguing that it is impossible to know how ancient individuals identified themselves.    According to the article, LGBT sex activists have long been pushing to introduce modern sensitivities into academia, adding that a tweet from Canadian master's degree candidate Emma Palladino, published earlier this month, apparently reignited the controversy.

 


LGBTQ activists seek to prevent scientists from identifying human remains as "male" or "female", arguing that it is impossible to know how ancient individuals identified themselves.


According to the article, LGBT sex activists have long been pushing to introduce modern sensitivities into academia, adding that a tweet from Canadian master's degree candidate Emma Palladino, published earlier this month, apparently reignited the controversy.


Palladino, who seeks an advanced degree in archaeology, argued that transgender individuals "cannot escape" the sex with which they were born, because archaeologists who someday find their bones will assign them the same sex they were at birth. Paladino called sex determination for the old man "bull * * * t."


Her initial tweet garnered more than 10000 retweets and nearly 60 thousand likes. "Gay archaeologists and sex scientists have been working for decades to deconstruct the assumptions that archaeologists make about gender and identity, both today and in the past." and indicating that any remnants are classified as "male" or "Female" is rarely the ultimate target of any excavation, stating that "Bioarchaeology is what we aim for, taking into account everything we discover about someone in an accurate and open biography of their lives."


She concluded by reassuring the LGBT community that even if "some archaeologists are bad in the future", it would never change those in life.


  • Other activists have also pushed to change the way anthropologists treat discovered bodies, according to The College Fix
  • a conservative US news site. He noted that a group called Trans Doe Task Force seeks to "explore ways in which current standards in
  • the identification of a criminal human being are harmful to people who are manifestly disproportionate to bisexuality."


The group's mission statement proposes a "gender-broadening approach to human identification" by examining bodies found on the basis of "contextual evidence" such as clothing "encoded to a sex other than its designated sex".


Associate Professor at the University of Kansas, Jennifer Raff, also argued that "there are no precise divisions between males and females physically or genetically", according to the website. Raf suggests that identifying only ancient remains as male or female is the concept of "duplication" imposed by Christian colonizers.


Meanwhile, some archaeologists are trying to fend off attempts to introduce modern sensitivities into this area. Speaking to The College Fix, Elizabeth Weiss


  1. Professor of Archaeology at San José State
  2. insisted that the abolition of gender classifications was "ideologically motivated misleading"
  3. and was a step backwards for science.


Weiss explained that the application of biological sex to remains often helped to dispel myths harmful to women. She gave an example of some early anthropologists who wrongly identified "strong female skeletons as male skeletons", reinforcing "false stereotypes that females do not work as hard as males. Over time, biological anthropologists and archaeologists have worked hard to identify features that are determined by sex, regardless of time and culture. This new policy to erase this progress is a step backwards for science and women. "


"Determining the sex of skeletal remains is a critical forensic skill and any reduction of this skill will negatively affect criminal investigations, thereby depriving victims and their families of justice."


"This is just another attempt to introduce the present ideology of vigilance where it does not belong," Weiss concluded.