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Trump proposed using nuclear weapons against North Korea and accusing another country of doing so

 


Trump proposed using nuclear weapons against North Korea

and accusing another country of doing so


During his presidency

former US President Donald Trump proposed a nuclear strike against North Korea and accusing another country of the attack, according to a book published on his presidential biography.



US media reported that behind closed doors in 2017

Donald Trump discussed the idea of using a nuclear weapon against North Korea and suggested he could blame a US strike against the communist regime on another country.


Trump's alleged remarks

first reported in a new book finale by New York Times Washington reporter Michael Schmidt, came as tensions between the United States and North Korea escalated Kim Jong Un

alarming then-White House Chief of Staff John Kelly.



The new section of Donald Trump v. United States

  • obtained by NBC News before being published in a paper cover on Tuesday
  • provides a thorough examination of Kelly's life

In part

Schmidt cites dozens of interviews with former

Trump administration officials and others who worked with Kelly.





The book stated that eight days after

Kelly arrived at the White House as chief of staff

Trump warned that North Korea would be

"met with fire and anger and with outright force, the world has never seen it."



When Trump delivered his first speech to the United Nations General Assembly in September 2017, he threatened to "destroy North Korea completely" if Kim, whom he referred to as the "rocket man

continued his military threats.

Later that month

Trump continued to urge North Korea via his tweets

but Schmidt was more concerned about what Trump was saying privately.


The book stated that what scared Kelly more than tweets was the fact that behind closed doors in the Oval Office, Trump continued to talk like he wanted to go to war.


He said that he had arrogantly discussed the idea of using a nuclear weapon against North Korea, saying: "If he did such an action, the Administration could blame someone else for acquitting itself of responsibility"

according to the new section of the book.



Kelly tried to use the mind to explain to Trump why this would not work, telling the former president: "It would be hard not to point fingers at us."


According to Schmidt

Pentagon leaders' attempts to inform the president of the consequences of the hot war between the United States and North Korea appear to have no bearing on Trump.



Trump's White House aides reportedly also expressed concerns that

  • the President would repeatedly talk over unclassified phones
  • with friends and those close to outside the government
  • about how he wanted to use military force against North Korea

Schmidt wrote

adding that Kelly should have reminded 

rump that he could not share classified information with his friends.



The writer explained that Kelly brought senior military leaders to the White House to brief Trump on how the war between the United States and North Korea could easily break out, as well as the huge consequences of such a conflict.


Schmidt writes that the debate over how

many people could be killed had no effect on Trump.


Kelly warned that Trump would need congressional approval to

deal a preemptive blow, which he saw and upset Trump.


According to the new section of the book

Kelly came up with a plan that he believed ultimately led

Trump to retreat in spring 2018


with the writer stating that Kelly convinced

the president that he could prove he was

"the greatest seller in the world"

by trying to establish a diplomatic relationship

thereby preventing a nuclear conflict that Kelly

and other senior military leaders saw as a direct threat.