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A former Trump official said Republican rhetoric directly fuels domestic terrorism and could be linked to the buffalo shooting.

Miles Taylor, a former deputy chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security, wrote on Twitter early Sunday morning that the words "leaders" of the Republican Party, presumably Donald Trump, were responsible for "directly" provoking violence such as the attack on the Buffalo supermarket on Saturday that left 10 people dead and others injured.

 



Following the mass shooting in Buffalo, New York, a former Donald Trump administration official warned of the dangers of far-right rhetoric.


Miles Taylor, a former deputy chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security, wrote on Twitter early Sunday morning that the words "leaders" of the Republican Party, presumably Donald Trump, were responsible for "directly" provoking violence such as the attack on the Buffalo supermarket on Saturday that left 10 people dead and others injured.


I've spent a decade working in counter-terrorism. The rhetoric we see from the leaders of my party -- the Republican Party -- directly fuels violence and escalates domestic terrorism. This is not a partisan observation. This is a public safety warning, "Taylor tweeted.



Taylor rose to prominence after revealing himself to be the author of an anonymous op-ed declaring himself a member of the Trump administration's "resistance."


  • On Sunday, news reports emerged revealing a shocking statement allegedly posted online by the accused shooter in Buffalo
  • in which he details white supremacist ideology and adopts the so
  • called "white replacement theory", a racist belief the American left is trying to win over. Power by attracting immigrants, especially immigrants of color
  •  to the United States in an attempt to gradually "replace" whites in American society.


Many perpetrators of mass violence around the world have embraced the racist idea, including the Christchurch and New Zealand shootings in 2019 and the attacks in Pittsburgh and El Paso in 2018 and 2020, respectively.


Many observers focused on GOP leaders adopting (or at least flirting) such rhetoric in the wake of Saturday's killing, where the alleged shooter was said to have traveled for hours to reach a black community where he could carry out his attack.


  1. On CNN's Inside Politics on Sunday, CNN's Abby Philip discussed the issue, noting that Elise Stefanik
  2. a New York congresswoman and leader of the House Republican Convention
  3. was reprimanded for using language in her campaign ads claiming
  4. "Joe Biden, Kamala Harris
  5. and Nancy Pelosi are trying to flood our voter roles with 11 million new voters by granting illegal immigrants pardons."


"Over the weekend, Adam Kinzinger highlighted no. 3 Republican at home, Elise Stefanik's use of the white replacement theory, "Philip said, before reading Kinzinger's tweet from the previous night:" 


Did you know that Stefanik is pushing the white replacement theory? 


No. 3 In the Republican Party, Liz Cheney was removed for demanding the truth. The Republican leader must be asked about this ".


Did you know: EliseStefanik pushes white replacement theory?


  •  No. 3 in GOP home. The Liz_Cheney was removed to claim the truth. GOPLeader should be asked about this.
  • Philip went on to say that Fox News' prime-time anchors, who are America's staunchest supporters of the far right, flirted with racist beliefs themselves.
  • "It's not just Elise Stefanik. If you're watching Fox News
  • this is the mainstay of peak hours. Tucker Carlson sometimes discusses it euphemistically, but not all this euphemism, "she said.


Ben Collins, an NBC News reporter covering the far right and disinformation, came to the same conclusion.


"He paid lip service to the theory of replacing great white supremacy," he wrote, explaining that NBC had confirmed that the statement had been published online on Thursday.


President Joe Biden described the crime as "domestic terrorism that fuels hatred," but did not immediately link the massacre to distant rights of support for the racist "white replacement theory."


"A racially motivated hate crime is abhorrent to the fabric of this nation. Any domestic terrorist act, including one committed in the name of an abhorrent white nationalist ideology, runs counter to everything we stand for in America. Hate must not have a safe haven. "We must do everything we can to end domestic terrorism that fuels hatred," the president said in a statement.


  • On the face of CBS, The Nation on Sunday, New York was more vocal, calling it "white supremacist terrorism."
  • Progressive party leaders, such as Boston Mayor Michel Wu, were less hesitant.
  • "We must confront and eradicate white supremacy and all forms of hatred in our society," she tweeted.


Currently, the right wing of the Republican Party shows no indications of slowing down its use of rhetoric that implicitly promotes extreme concerns.



Just hours after the attack, Republican Senate candidate Blake Masters used Twitter to promote a clip of himself on conservative commentator Ben Shapiro's program, in which Masters embraced the same concerns about Democrats trying to "bring" tens of millions of illegal immigrants and give them citizenship in order to increase their total vote in the upcoming election.