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The increase in mass shootings is being blamed on 'these dang smartphones,' according to a Republican congressman from Texas.

 




Rep. Pat Fallon (R-Texas) rejects calls for stronger gun legislation, blaming the increase in mass shootings on smartphone use.


Fallon told members of Congress during a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on gun violence on Wednesday that weapons had long existed before mass shootings became highly regular in the United States.


"The truth is that weapons have always been available in this country," Fallon said. But mass shootings, particularly mass shootings at schools, do not exist or at least are extremely rare until a recent phenomenon is appalling. So what has changed in the last 50 years? "


After that, the Republican congressman continued to put forward his own theory. "There was a clear family breakup. 


Because of the overuse of these smartphones and the spread of social media social media ", which may be better described as anti-social media, There was an erosion of faith and a dramatic decrease in social interactions and, in large part, due to the overuse of these, Fallon said that Danj smartphones and the spread of social media, which may be better described as anti-social media social interactions ", there was an erosion of faith and a sharp reduction in social interactions.


After that, the Republican congressman continued to present his own theory. “There has been a clear familial breakup. Due to the overuse of these dang smartphones and the proliferation of social media, which is probably better described as anti-social media, there has been an erosion of faith and a seismic drop in social interactions, in large part due to the overuse of these dang smartphones and the proliferation of social media, which is probably better described as anti-social media, there has been an erosion of faith and a seismic drop in social interactions “While holding up his own phone, Fallon said.



Fallon's remarks came after dramatic testimony from armed violence survivors and their families, including Water Cyrillo, 11, an Ovaldi School, Texas shooting survivor who told Congress she covered herself in the blood of her friend to play dead while the perpetrator slaughtered her classmates and a teacher. Kimberly and Felix Rubio, parents of Uvalde fourth-grade victim Alexandra "Lexi" Anyyah Rubio, were among the other witnesses who defended stricter gun laws during their testimony.