Min menu

Pages

latest news

Britain announces long-range laser anti-aerial weapon test


 


Britain announces

 long-range laser anti-aerial weapon test


On Friday, the British government announced the success of 

a long-range laser anti-aerial weapon test conducted in Scotland.


The government said in a statement via its website that laser technology

 successfully used against aerial targets in the Ministry of

 Defence's Hebrides area could "enhance British armed forces operations

 more accurately while reducing reliance on high-cost ammunition."



The DragonFire (LDEW)

 laser-guided energy weapon system achieved the UK's first high-power

launch of a laser weapon against long-range aerial targets, indicating that

the extent to which the DragonFire weapon can reach is secret

but it is "a weapon on the line of sight and can handle any visible target."



It reported that

 the laser weapon is "extremely precise"

equivalent to hitting a £1000-metre coin

adding:

 "Laser-guided energy weapons can clash with targets at light speed

 and use an intense beam of light to penetrate the target

resulting in structural failure

 or more impactful results if the warhead is targeted."



"This type of sophisticated weapon has the potential to revolutionize 

the battlefield by reducing reliance on expensive ammunition

while also reducing the risk of collateral damage," 

Defense Secretary Grant Chap said.


"Investments with industry partners in advanced technologies such

 as DragonFire are critical in a highly competitive world, helping us 

maintain the advantage of winning the battle and keeping the nation safe."


First High 

Powered Laser Weapon Launch Against Air Targets

Laser features accurate precision and low long-term costs

Partnership with industry makes positive progress for UK armed forces



DragonFire exploits British technology to be able to launch high-power

 lasers over a long period. The required precision is equivalent to hitting

 a £1 coin from a distance of 1 km.


Laser-guided energy weapons can clash with targets at light speed

and use an intense beam of light to penetrate the target

resulting in structural failure or more impactful results if the warhead is targeted.


Igniting it for 10 seconds equals the cost of using a normal heater 

for only an hour. Therefore, it has the potential to be a long-range

low-cost alternative to some of the tasks currently being performed 

by missiles. Laser running cost is usually less than £10 per shot